Feb 172012
 

Maybe something representative of the user experience. Maybe something that depicts how the user will feel once they realize they’re essentially running iWindows OS on top of Windows 7 for no good reason. Let’s show people what that would look like against all of our previous logos to give them a sense of how it evolved.

Hmmm…needs more fire.

Feb 172012
 

As much of a resource as Gizmodo is for the latest Lego news, it’s part of Gawker and, well I guess I can put a period after that. Because they make a lot of their money writing dick things about Apple, the company stopped inviting them to press events long ago. When Gizmodo bought a stolen prototype of the iPhone 4, they were dicks to Steve Jobs when he asked for it back. Their site went on to register millions of pageview from stories about Apple’s stolen phone. The editors involved escaped prosecution for the crime, apparently because they were under 18. The San Mateo County DA had this to say about their journalistic integrity:

“It was obvious they were angry with the company about not being invited to some press conference or some big Apple event…We expected to see a certain amount of professionalism-this is like 15-year-old children talking.”

Unsurprisingly, Gizmodo also reads like 15-year-old children writing. So why would the highly-esteemed Gray Lady share anything with populist hit-whores more interested in pageviews than actual journalism?  For acting like populist hit-whores more interested in selling copy than actual journalism. That’s right: it looks like the New York Times has been Gizmodoed, which can either mean having Apple bitch-slap you with your press card or having your trade show pranked. I’m sure there’s a bunch of other things it could mean, but I’m only halfway through my first cup.

The real victim here is Times tech guy David Pogue, who was locked out of the Mountain Lion preview given to dozens of his tech press peers, and – how do I say this kindly – some people that were not. He was reduced to pulling impressions from other writers before he could get his hands on the developer preview, which was made available to all the unwashed through Apple’s Developer Center yesterday ($99 annual membership to ADC required). The shame is that Pogue’s reviews do right by Apple and he had enjoyed a Mossbergian level of access prior to the hilariously unsourced singling-out of the company for its labor practices with Foxconn in China. He should check in with those Business Section guys and thank them for “breaking out the gimp” on his career.

Update: Gruber confirmed what commenter Spade mentioned: Pogue had the same level of access as the rest of the technorati. Apparently he was next in line for an interview with Schiller.

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